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PayPal Invoices Used for Data Theft

The past few months have seen an increase in the usage of convincing phishing emails made using an attack on PayPal’s invoice system. Scammers are constantly seeking new ways to steal your personal information or money. 

Hackers send bogus invoices from PayPal’s website using a free PayPal account they have registered. The emails’ bodies contained spoof logos of companies like Norton to make their recipients believe they were authentic.

Emails from PayPal will likely be delivered to your inbox rather than your spam bin because they are not regarded as spam. Because it came from a real Paypal account, the email will appear to be trustworthy so users are advised to stay cautious and not fall for it. You won’t receive a worthwhile service if you pay this charge, cybercriminals will receive your money and use it for their own gain. 

The PayPal invoices feature statements like “thank you for purchasing Norton Security Premium package, if you have not authorized this transaction, please call us with your credit card details.” They resemble a related fraud that employed phony Quickbooks invoices and was disclosed earlier this month.

The scam, often known as a “double spear” assault, prompts users to call the number, at which point hackers attempt to get them to pay the invoice and steal their credit card information.

Phishing efforts are frequent and come in a variety of shapes, according to a written statement from PayPal.

PayPal stated that it has a zero-tolerance policy for attempted fraud on the platform and that its team is working relentlessly to protect its consumers.

“We are aware of this well-known phishing scheme and have added more measures to help mitigate this particular incidence,” the company said. “Nevertheless, we advise clients to exercise constant vigilance online and to get in touch with Customer Service immediately if they believe they are a victim of a scam.”

It’s astonishing how well-adapted modern fraudsters are at using the very same technologies that financial institutions have long utilized to provide their consumers a sense of security while dealing online. 

Today’s scamsters seem to be more interested in hacking your entire computer and online life with remote administration software than they are in stealing your PayPal password, which seems to be at the center of the majority of frauds these days.

Users are advised to follow the guidelines given below in order to safeguard themselves against the aforementioned scam. 

  • To prevent phishing emails from being sent to you, don’t rely on email spam filters. Examine emails for warning signs, such as impending deadlines and scare tactics, to spot potential phishing frauds.
  • Use a recognized phone number or email address to get in touch with the service provider directly to confirm the validity of an invoice. To get in touch with the service provider, do not utilize the phone number or link provided in the invoice.
  • The simple notion that an email was delivered via a reputable website should not be used as proof of its validity. To make their schemes seem more credible, cybercriminals can exploit reliable websites.



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